Tag Archives: The Jungle Effect

Sustainable Living: Big Picture, Baby Goals (Week 8)

In light of reading The Jungle Effect, I’m thrilled that I have already incorporated some of Dr. Miller’s findings from exploring indigenous diets around the world. For example, I am:

  • Growing much of my food
  • Learning to prepare and store food
  • Purchasing mainly whole, unprocessed, local-grown, organic foods
  • Reading labels to select the healthiest versions of processed foods
  • Preparing whole and simple processed foods in combination for synergistic health effects
  • Eating many of the foods she recommends on a regular basis such as organic milk, kefir, cinnamon, honey, vanilla, organic meat, tomatoes, cilantro, onions, cabbage, squash, green beans, olive oil, garlic, flax seed, vinegar, oregano, kale, kefir, potatoes (small, waxy, with skins), lemon, walnuts, free-range eggs, raisins, apples, ginger, and dried fruit.

I will build on these healthy habits by integrating new ones and more of the foods she recommends. I definitely need more fish and greens. In fact, this book has solidified my plans to undertake a small-scale aquaponics operation at my rural homestead because it is growing increasingly difficult to find nontoxic fish. I assume the fish recommendations Dr. Miller provides in the book are outdated given recent nuclear disasters and oil spills. Thus, I’m not willing to trust any third-party sources of fish, although I am hopeful that the organic fish market will become a viable option soon.

In general, I’m buoyed by the myriad of food and sustainability movements in the world that may deliver us back into a healthier era. Industrialization has given us lots of great inventions and social improvements but has introduced new problems for which solutions are desperately needed. Upon reflection, changes for the good are possible when the masses are paying attention and poised for change.

As for my sustainable living goals, I caught an illness earlier this week. It’s been running its course through most of my students and settling on my husband who had almost recovered when I caught it. I mistakenly thought it had passed me by, but alas, it got me. With extra doses of apple cider vinegar and ginger-infused tinctures, I was able to conquer it in a few days versus the 2- to 3-week cycle I’ve witnessed in others. Despite the illness, I managed to make cereal bars from The Homemade Pantry (easy, convenient, and delicious), order low-sugar pectin to make the jam I need for the toaster pastries, order organic vanilla beans for making homemade vanilla extract, and order seeds to grow an indoor lemon tree.

Additionally, I was able to care for and transplant seedlings. I was delighted to learn that my 12-year-old planted some seeds in science class, and we were able to compare results. Now that his seedlings have sprouted, he seems more interested in our growing efforts around the house. What a relief from the usual video-game mentality! The imitation instinct is alive and well!

My goal for next week is to master the art of composting, or at least learn all I can. I’ve begun to save some organic materials for it (banana peels, coffee grounds, veg waste, egg shellsetc.), so I need to get started. This effort will further reduce my weekly curbside contributions to the garbage collectors.

Thanks for reading and sharing your sustainable living experiences!

A.M. Tuesday

I think this will be the most helpful, practical “diet” book I’ve ever read. I’ve never read one all the way through until now, but I believe I will use this one every day for the rest of my life. It just makes sense.

In the beginning, Dr. Miller confesses to trying to handle her patients’ health problems as any doctor would, offering the usual diets, exercises, and prescriptions. But they rarely worked and sometimes made the problems worse. The typical health issues she witnessed in her San Francisco practice included depression, heart disease, respiratory disease, bowel disease, diabetes, cancer, and the like. Dr. Miller gives several reasons for her inability to lend patients reliable diet advice: (1) nutrition contributes to overall health in the long-term, and few studies run long enough to determine the outcomes of consuming certain nutrients; (2) foods with the same name may contain vastly different…

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Sustainable Living: Big Picture, Baby Goals (Week 6)

Just a quick update today. With Easter and husband’s illness, I’ve not had enough time to fulfill all my goals from last week. My peas, green beans, and tomatoes are taking off, and I will have extras to give away. Sharing is one of the great joys of my life. (Unfortunately, some people take it the wrong way or misconstrue my intentions. I really only have one motivation for sharing. I feel good about it; no strings attached—really, that’s all! Weird, I know. When a trade can be made, that’s fun too!)

To my dismay, many of my seeds sprouted and died from lack of moisture. We can’t stay at this house every day of the week, so the sprouts burned up. I figure terrarium-style planting will solve my problem. (Gardening is trial and error, anyway, right?) Reusing my eggshells, I replanted the kale, peppers, carrots, and zucchini in clear containers with lids. I planted the potatoes in the Smart Pots and placed them in a sunny spot. Next week, I intend to plant three more veggies: cucumbers, butternut squash, and some kind of onion (suggestions welcome). Other than that, I plan to nab some herbs from a neighbor to plant by the kitchen sink and be done planting for the season (except for flowers).

As for The Homemade Pantry, I’ve got my ingredient list for toaster pastries made out. I hope to get to the store sometime this weekend, so I can have everything on hand when I make them next week. My other goal is to get my seeds to sprout.

Sustainable Living: Big Picture, Baby Goals (Week 5)

Because of another obligation, I was not able to publish a post last Friday, so I will write two this week. Honestly, I’ve been reading more than writing lately. Ever since I quit grad school (long story, dirty scam!), I’ve been devouring books for pleasure. (It’s been five long years of deprivation from one of my favorite pasttimes!) I’m now reading three books at once, one fiction and two nonfiction. I finished a fiction novel last week for which I intend to write a book review on my other blog. Actually, I intend to write reviews of all the books I read from now on.

I mentioned one of the books in a previous post. I am so glad I purchased The Jungle Effect. The more I read, the more sense it makes. I intend to follow its philosophy for the rest of my life. I will write more extensively about it soon.

As for my goal for last week, I cared for my seedlings and planted the Amish snap peas in their permanent pots today (with the help of my husband, of course). On Wednesday, I will transfer any ready sprouts to their permanent pots. I think the rest of the peas and the Brandywine tomatoes will be big enough to plant. I received my order of Smart Pots last week, and I will use them to plant potatoes on Wednesday, too. I learned about a method for growing potatoes in the Smart Pots from fellow blogger GreenEggs, except I am planting in two larger pots (golds and reds). I’m growing my entire garden in pots because I’m hoping to move mid to late summer.

My other goal of making some recipes from The Homemade Pantry got pushed into this week because some of these recipes are quite complicated. Each recipe is made from multiple homemade concoctions. So, I really need to plan out how I’m going set up the infrastructure for making all this homemade food. I did get all the ingredients to make cereal bars, which do not require any other homemade item. I’ve made these before a few times and have altered the recipe to my liking. My goal by Friday will be to generate a list of all the ingredients I will need to complete at least one of the recipes from the book.

To conclude, I want to mention a new invention over which I am extremely ecstatic—a machine that converts plastic into oil or gas. As my overall waste production continues to dwindle, I can’t help but notice that the number one waste product I can’t seem to reduce much is plastic. But here is a viable solution I hope goes mainstream.

Please share your thoughts. Thank you for sharing in my journey!